To Make Hands Meet

  Organized by Slaveil, To Make Hands Meet features meaningful works realized in collaboration with photographer Michela Cella.

What happens when millennials, conceptual photography, bodypainting, and the desire to disclose a meaningful insight meet to create some visual food for thoughts?

This series of shots celebrates the creative collaboration between photographer Michela Cella, blogger Maria Chiara Dellachà, artist Eugenia Cesario, and many students from all around the world.



The 21st century is the century of Black Fridays and cheap clothes reflecting the disappearing of the middle class. It’s the age of global issues, trend following and complacency.

But the 21stcentury is also the age of internationality, of awareness, of effective actions, and a desire to change the things we are not willing to accept. It’s the century of communities, the age of people standing together and making good use of their voices.



These pieces demonstrate the power of images while telling a too often disregarded truth. A thorough exploration of the work reveals a two-fold mission: to expose today’s society to photography as a mean of making an impact instead of reducing it to a way to get likes on social media, and to raise awareness on one of the most tragic humanitarian issue of our time.



The concept was developed by Slaveil, a blog on ethical lifestyle centered on the toll of fast fashion. But the realization of the project wouldn’t have been possible without the help of every single participant who contributed to the success of the work with remarkable enthusiasm and creativity. 

To Make Hands Meet is a purposeful project, a smart collaboration witnessing once again the power of working together.

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 “I wanted people to feel that they are part of all this, but not in a shocking way.

I wanted to have an emotional impact, but one which leaves the viewers feeling they have the power to make changes, instead of provoking a barren disappointment.

The pictures also challenge the viewers to question their moral values.

I started creating written content, but with my collaborator and good friend Electra, we soon realized I needed to find a more impactful mean to pass the message”.

Photographic project

THERE ARE HUMANS BEHIND THE CLOTHES WE WEAR

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Some 100 pairs of human hands touch our clothes before we see them in stores or online. Redefining our relationship with things is an opportunity to redefine our relationship with each other.

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 𝘖𝘯 𝘐𝘯𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘯𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘭 𝘞𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘯 𝘋𝘢𝘺 𝘪𝘯 1997, 𝘊𝘢𝘳𝘮𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘵𝘢 𝘈𝘭𝘰𝘯𝘻𝘰 𝘥𝘪𝘦𝘥 𝘰𝘧 𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬 𝘮𝘢𝘬𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘤𝘭𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘴 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘧𝘢𝘴𝘵 𝘧𝘢𝘴𝘩𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘣𝘳𝘢𝘯𝘥𝘴 𝘪𝘯 𝘢 𝘧𝘢𝘤𝘵𝘰𝘳𝘺 𝘭𝘰𝘤𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘪𝘯 𝘊𝘢𝘷𝘪𝘵𝘦. 𝘚𝘩𝘦 𝘩𝘢𝘥 𝘣𝘦𝘦𝘯 𝘧𝘰𝘳𝘤𝘦𝘥 𝘵𝘰 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬 𝘭𝘰𝘯𝘨 𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘯𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘵 𝘴𝘩𝘪𝘧𝘵𝘴 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳 𝘢 𝘸𝘦𝘦𝘬 𝘥𝘶𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘢 𝘱𝘦𝘢𝘬 𝘣𝘶𝘴𝘺 𝘴𝘦𝘢𝘴𝘰𝘯 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘤𝘢𝘮𝘦 𝘥𝘰𝘸𝘯 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘱𝘯𝘦𝘶𝘮𝘰𝘯𝘪𝘢. 𝘚𝘩𝘦 𝘸𝘢𝘴 𝘥𝘦𝘯𝘪𝘦𝘥 𝘵𝘪𝘮𝘦 𝘰𝘧𝘧. 𝘌𝘷𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘶𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘺 𝘴𝘩𝘦 𝘸𝘢𝘴 𝘵𝘢𝘬𝘦𝘯 𝘵𝘰 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘩𝘰𝘴𝘱𝘪𝘵𝘢𝘭 𝘸𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘦 𝘴𝘩𝘦 𝘥𝘪𝘦𝘥 𝘰𝘯 𝘔𝘢𝘳𝘤𝘩 8. 𝘚𝘩𝘦 𝘩𝘢𝘥 𝘢 𝘧𝘢𝘮𝘪𝘭𝘺 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘢 𝘭𝘪𝘧𝘦, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘴𝘩𝘦 𝘥𝘪𝘦𝘥 𝘮𝘢𝘬𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘤𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘱 𝘤𝘭𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘣𝘢𝘣𝘭𝘺 𝘣𝘦𝘦𝘯
𝘭𝘰𝘯𝘨 𝘭𝘢𝘯𝘥𝘧𝘪𝘭𝘭𝘦𝘥 𝘣𝘺 𝘯𝘰𝘸. 

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A shirt is never just a shirt. Everything we wear is tied to history, meaning and relations of production. Most of our clothes are made by people seeking opportunities, people made poor by the same system that makes us the rich ones.

One of the biggest lies we can tell ourselves is that the things we use and wear just appear without context, consequence or purpose.

CHILDREN ARE MEANT TO LEARN NOT TO EARN

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Distance creates comfort and complacency. But with social media, poor working conditions are being progressively exposed leading Western governments and citizens to face an uncomfortable truth: whether implicit or explicit, we have all contributed to the rise of modern slavery, and we are all a part of this problem.

Tragedies such as Rana Plaza collapse will keep happening, and kids and families will keep dying sewing the t-shirt we buy at $4.99, wear twice and then forget about.


𝘖𝘯 𝘢 𝘲𝘶𝘪𝘦𝘵 𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘦𝘦𝘵 𝘢 𝘧𝘦𝘸 𝘮𝘪𝘭𝘦𝘴 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘙𝘢𝘯𝘢 𝘗𝘭𝘢𝘻𝘢, 𝘚𝘩𝘢𝘩𝘫𝘢𝘩𝘢𝘯 𝘚𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘮 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬𝘴 𝘪𝘯 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘴𝘮𝘢𝘭𝘭 𝘴𝘩𝘰𝘱. 𝘛𝘩𝘦 37-𝘺𝘦𝘢𝘳-𝘰𝘭𝘥 𝘤𝘢𝘯𝘯𝘰𝘵 𝘶𝘴𝘦 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘸𝘦𝘭𝘭,𝘴𝘰 𝘴𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘵𝘪𝘮𝘦𝘴 𝘤𝘶𝘴𝘵𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘳𝘴 𝘨𝘦𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘪𝘳 𝘰𝘸𝘯 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘦 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘢 𝘱𝘭𝘢𝘴𝘵𝘪𝘤 𝘣𝘰𝘹 𝘰𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘵𝘦𝘳.

𝘔𝘳 𝘚𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘮 𝘸𝘢𝘴 𝘢 𝘴𝘶𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘷𝘪𝘴𝘰𝘳 𝘰𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘧𝘪𝘧𝘵𝘩 𝘧𝘭𝘰𝘰𝘳 𝘰𝘧 𝘙𝘢𝘯𝘢 𝘗𝘭𝘢𝘻𝘢. 𝘏𝘦 𝘸𝘢𝘴 𝘶𝘯𝘪𝘯𝘫𝘶𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘥 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘰𝘭𝘭𝘢𝘱𝘴𝘦. 𝘉𝘶𝘵 𝘩𝘦 𝘸𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘣𝘢𝘤𝘬 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘸𝘳𝘦𝘤𝘬𝘢𝘨𝘦 𝘸𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘩𝘦 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘥 𝘤𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘴 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱. 𝘖𝘷𝘦𝘳 𝘧𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘥𝘢𝘺𝘴, 𝘔𝘳 𝘚𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘮 𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘤𝘶𝘦𝘥 37 𝘱𝘦𝘰𝘱𝘭𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘳𝘦𝘤𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘦𝘥 28 𝘣𝘰𝘥𝘪𝘦𝘴.

𝘖𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘧𝘰𝘶𝘳𝘵𝘩 𝘥𝘢𝘺, 𝘩𝘦 𝘧𝘳𝘦𝘦𝘥 𝘢 𝘮𝘢𝘯, 𝘣𝘶𝘵 𝘵𝘰 𝘥𝘰 𝘴𝘰 𝘩𝘦 𝘧𝘦𝘭𝘭 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘮𝘰𝘳𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘯 12 𝘮𝘦𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘴. 𝘏𝘦 𝘴𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘰𝘶𝘴𝘭𝘺 𝘪𝘯𝘫𝘶𝘳𝘦𝘥 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘣𝘢𝘤𝘬.

𝘏𝘦 𝘴𝘢𝘺𝘴 𝘩𝘦 𝘩𝘢𝘴 𝘢 𝘭𝘰𝘵 𝘰𝘧 𝘥𝘪𝘧𝘧𝘪𝘤𝘶𝘭𝘵𝘪𝘦𝘴, 𝘣𝘶𝘵 𝘴𝘵𝘪𝘭𝘭 𝘩𝘢𝘴 𝘵𝘰 𝘵𝘳𝘺 𝘵𝘰 𝘥𝘰 𝘴𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨. '𝘛𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘪𝘴 𝘭𝘪𝘧𝘦' 𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘢𝘺𝘴. '𝘠𝘰𝘶 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘰𝘷𝘦 𝘧𝘰𝘳𝘸𝘢𝘳𝘥'


In Bangladesh, the largest part of the population works in the garment industry.

But this rapacious industry is unable to put people before profit. For these people, clothes are both their only source of life, and their coffin.


DOES PRICE REFLECT WORTH?

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From an early age we learn what to think, but it is not much more important that as children we learn how to think, rather than what to think. We no longer learn to listen to each other and lead our own life following our own beliefs. Instead, we learn how to lead an 'ideal' life in this society, how to follow the same unspoken jobs, how important it is to manage money and power.

𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞, 𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠?

Instead of focusing on numbers and status, we need to focus on a society in which life counts, in which you and I are more important than our incomes and expenses. A society in which we look at each other more often.


Our priority should be to work together for a better society. A society in which we are equal, in which every individual has a voice. 𝐏𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐲 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐝 𝐚 𝐬𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐭𝐲.

IN MEMORY OF ALL VICTIMS OF FAST FASHION

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⏰𝐈𝐭'𝐬 𝐀𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐥 𝟐𝟑, 𝟐𝟎𝟏𝟑. 𝐈𝐭'𝐬 𝟕𝐚𝐦.

𝐈𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐡𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐬, 𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐛𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐤𝐟𝐚𝐬𝐭, 𝐩𝐚𝐜𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐟𝐟 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤/𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐨𝐥 𝐝𝐚𝐲 𝐚𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐝, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧, 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝𝐛𝐲𝐞𝐬 𝐬𝐚𝐢𝐝, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐠𝐨 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐞𝐭𝐬, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐦𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐟𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐚 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐜𝐞.

𝘐𝘵'𝘴 𝘈𝘱𝘳𝘪𝘭 23, 2013. 𝘐𝘵'𝘴 7𝘢𝘮.

𝘐𝘯 𝘩𝘶𝘯𝘥𝘳𝘦𝘥𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘩𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘴, 𝘵𝘦𝘯𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘰𝘶𝘴𝘢𝘯𝘥𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘱𝘦𝘰𝘱𝘭𝘦 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘴𝘤𝘰𝘰𝘱𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘳𝘪𝘤𝘦 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘵𝘪𝘯 𝘣𝘰𝘸𝘭𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘬𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘭𝘦𝘧𝘵𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘴 𝘵𝘰 𝘦𝘢𝘵 𝘥𝘶𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘭𝘰𝘯𝘨 𝘥𝘢𝘺 𝘢𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘥, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘺 𝘧𝘪𝘭𝘦 𝘰𝘶𝘵 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘦𝘦𝘵𝘴, 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘮𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬𝘦𝘳𝘴 𝘧𝘭𝘰𝘸𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘨𝘩 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘵𝘰𝘸𝘯, 𝘢𝘭𝘭 𝘭𝘦𝘢𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘰 𝘙𝘢𝘯𝘢 𝘗𝘭𝘢𝘻𝘢.

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☀𝐀𝐭 𝟖𝐚𝐦, 𝐚𝐬 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐝𝐚𝐲 𝐞𝐱𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐤𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬, 𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐨𝐥𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬, 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐚𝐝𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞𝐬.

𝘈𝘵 8𝘢𝘮, 𝘢𝘴 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘥𝘢𝘺, 𝘰𝘯 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘧𝘭𝘰𝘰𝘳 𝘰𝘧 𝘙𝘢𝘯𝘢 𝘗𝘭𝘢𝘻𝘢 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘣𝘦𝘭𝘭 𝘴𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘥𝘴, 𝘤𝘰𝘯𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘴𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘦𝘯𝘥𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬 𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘳𝘵𝘴.

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🏠𝐈𝐭'𝐬 𝟖𝐩𝐦, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐡𝐨𝐦𝐞 

𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐚 𝐥𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐝𝐚𝐲. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐫, 𝐰𝐚𝐭𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐯 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐠𝐨 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐝.

𝘐𝘵' 8𝘱𝘮, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 2,515 𝘱𝘦𝘰𝘱𝘭𝘦 𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘩𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘮𝘶𝘵𝘪𝘭𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘳𝘢𝘶𝘮𝘢𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘻𝘦𝘥. 1129 𝘱𝘦𝘰𝘱𝘭𝘦 𝘥𝘪𝘥'𝘵 𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘩𝘰𝘮𝘦, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘯𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳 𝘸𝘪𝘭𝘭.

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It's September 15, 2019, and people have forgotten.

It's September 15, 2019, and people can't forget.

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